Wanna Feel Old?

Look at what song was number one on the Billboard chart the day you were born. (HT: Ann Althouse) Yikes! Of course, it doesn’t have to be your birthday. Other important days (some of which are rather ironic): Stock market crash, October 28-29, 1929: “Tip Toe Through the Tulips” by Nick Lucas FDR’s inauguration, March 4, 1933: “You’re Getting to Be a Habit with Me” … Continue reading Wanna Feel Old?

The Day the Music Companies Died

Charlie Martin writes an obituary, perhaps not too far in advance, for the record companies: There is a new business model coming, one that will be built around the musicians and their works; promoting them, getting them visibility, letting people know about them. It will be good for musicians themselves, and not just the big name acts: with a potential audience of billions of people, … Continue reading The Day the Music Companies Died

Your Brain on Jazz

I worry about improvising while undergoing an MRI, but the results are intriguing: The scientists found that a region of the brain known as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a broad portion of the front of the brain that extends to the sides, showed a slowdown in activity during improvisation. This area has been linked to planned actions and self-censoring, such as carefully deciding what words … Continue reading Your Brain on Jazz

The End of the Music Industry?

Is the CD becoming extinct?  How is anyone going to make money from music?  (HT: Instapundit and Samizdata)  IN 2006 EMI, the world’s fourth-biggest recorded-music company, invited some teenagers into its headquarters in London to talk to its top managers about their listening habits. At the end of the session the EMI bosses thanked them for their comments and told them to help themselves to a big pile of CDs sitting … Continue reading The End of the Music Industry?

Losing Branches—and Finding Them Again

Deep thoughts from Glenn Reynolds here. I like the “Garden of Forking Paths” image invoked by Jorge Luis Borges and exploited by Anil Gupta and Richmond Thomason in their development a logic that combines tense and modality. From that point of view, as we get older, the garden in front of us thins. I had thought of that as discouraging. But it also shrinks opportunity … Continue reading Losing Branches—and Finding Them Again

Handel’s Messiah

The St. Cecilia Music Series is sponsoring a performance of Handel’s Messiah—the 1759 Foundling Hospital version, the last version Handel himself prepared, unabridged, on baroque instruments—over three nights at St. Martin’s Lutheran Church, 15th Street, Austin, Texas: Friday, November 30, 7pm: Part I. Saturday, December 1, 7pm: Part II. Sunday, December 2, 6pm: Part III. Continue reading Handel’s Messiah