Re: Revising History

I’m sure this would give Prof. Sadun heartburn, but he really needs to watch it.  Please comment.  I’m interested in hearing from the “experts” who read this blog about the descriptions of the various forms of government. Continue reading Re: Revising History

Profile in Sanity

Stranger in a Strange Land, former President Bush attorney John Yoo at home in Berkeley CA, despite calls for his ouster. “I think of myself as being West Berlin during the Cold War, a shining beacon of capitalism and democracy surrounded by a sea of Marxism,” Yoo observes, sipping iced tea in the faculty club lounge, a wan smile registering the discomfort of colleagues walking … Continue reading Profile in Sanity

Survey of college students and civics

Rush Limbaugh referred to this survey , “The Shaping of the American Mind: The Diverging Influences of the College Degree and Civic Learning on American Beliefs,” today during the second hour of his show today. Its hard to believe some of the findings: Here are a few frightening figures certain to keep you up at night: 71% of Americans failed the civics knowledge test; 51% … Continue reading Survey of college students and civics

History of the World

Sports Talk radio is an unlikely source for recommendations to enlightening and educational listening. Yet based on a hearty review by The Ticket’s Bob Sturm, co-host of Bad Radio in Dallas TX, I have decided to give the BBC’s podcasts of “History Of The World In 100 Objects” a tumble. Of the few I have heard, these little programs are quite listenable, enjoyable, informative, and … Continue reading History of the World

Civic Illiteracy

The Intercollegiate Studies Institute has devised a quiz testing civic literacy. The average score is only 49%– though it improved to 78% online in November, perhaps because the online group is self-selected, and perhaps because elections improve awareness of civic matters for a while. The most remarkable finding is that elected officials do worse than average, scoring only 44%! You can take the quiz here. … Continue reading Civic Illiteracy

How to Get Smart

There’s some evidence that thinking makes it so—not in the obvious sense that thinking makes you smarter, but in the sense that thinking you’re getting smarter actually makes you smarter. Positive thinking really does have power. I hesitate to endorse this, because I’ve known plenty of people who thought they were smarter than they really were. But I suspect there’s something to it nevertheless. Your … Continue reading How to Get Smart

Wretchard on Higher Education

Wretchard (in his new home in Pajamas Media!) writes of the political correctness of academia, with some optimism that it is now around halfway through its life-cycle. Picking up on his theme that higher education functions primarily to sort students by IQ, a commenter remarks that the growth of higher education stems from Griggs v. Duke Power, the case in which the Supreme Court held … Continue reading Wretchard on Higher Education